CELEBRATING!

fall

Hello Friends,

WordPress tells me that it’s my 6th anniversary, but I seem to be one year off. Anyway, I’ll take it if it’s cause for celebration. 🙂 This blogging journey has been wonderful in so many ways, mostly because I’ve met all of you! I know I’ve taken some breaks, and I also haven’t blogged in the last few weeks because this class I’m taking demands a LOT of homework. I’m trying to find some type of balance, but I guess I’m just moving around here slowly. I’m done with this week’s h/w though, which is due tomorrow by noon, so I’m going to dive into my inundated email this morning and read some blogs I’ve unintentionally ignored. ♥

I’ll end with, not only a fun haiku for the new autumn season (ironically, we’re having 100 degree weather), but with also another BIG “Thank You” for all your likes and comments, but most importantly, your friendship, love, and support. ♥

pumpkins on the porch
sandles in hybernation
hello socks and boots

HAVE A WONDERFUL AND PEACEFUL SUNDAY! SENDING LOTS OF LOVE, LAUREN ♥

 

 

 

Mirage

His mind floated through life
where it couldn’t be stopped,
even his logic kept flight

Her face controlled his dreams
as he struggled between the
crevices of reality
below the moon’s supervision

He desired to write poetry,
wordless poetry on her silky skin,
how the touch and taste of her
would be rich to his spirit

But knowing she was far out of reach,
her whispered kisses
wove softly through his fingers

 Lauren Scott © 2016

Here’s the Scoop…

Dear Friends,

As most of you know, I took a three month break from blogging, and I have recently returned. I missed it, and I missed seeing all of you who have faithfully followed and supported me. I’ve taken many breaks throughout the past five years, so please know that I’m not crazy…But I have to be honest with myself in realizing that blogging just isn’t in me anymore. I’ve started slowly with college (which I snubbed soon after high school), but I’ll begin to take more classes each semester to finish earlier-or at least before I’m too old to walk across the stage-and if I do this, blogging won’t have a time slot. Honestly, writing poems is still on the back burner, but my next English class will involve creative writing and poetry, which might help stir up some inspiration.

So…I’m going to keep my blog open (for now), but I won’t be continuing to interact in the blog world. For five years, this blog has been a big part of my life, but I feel that part has run its course, and now a new chapter is evolving. I guess I won’t say that I’ll “never” return, but for now, it looks unlikely. I’m excited about my college journey, even in mid life, and I have officially decided to pursue an Associates Degree in English, and who knows, I may even go for a Bachelor’s! You’re never too old, right?

Anyway, that’s it, my honest feelings. I tried and gave it another shot, thinking that I would jump right back in like before, but things are different now. I’ve changed and so has life. I sincerely wish you all the best, and I’ll miss you.
So…Stay Safe, and Be Happy!

With Love, Hugs, and Blessings,
Lauren ♥

 

 

 

New Beginning

The first day of spring
has come and gone
and only a speck
of sun has shown

Instead, tears fall
from the sky at dawn
and leaves remain
windblown

Lauren Scott © 2016

(For those of you who read my previous post,
you’ll know that poetry inspiration has been nil.
These words recently came to me though, and I
hope you enjoy.)

 

Celebrating 5 years with WordPress! :)

HAPPY ANNIVERSARY!

wordpress anniversary

 

 

You registered on WordPress.com 5 years ago!
Thanks for flying with us. Keep up the good blogging!

Another year zoomed by since I last celebrated with WordPress and

I’ll repeat my story from last year…I opened this blog in 2010,
became active in 2011, 
so I’m always one year behind. 🙂

celebrate

In addition to my “blogiversary”, I’d like to  celebrate the making of new friends, the joy of learning, the amazing following, the expansion of communicationand most of all, the fun! Cheers to taking life less seriously and having more fun! 


Writing for our blogs is a great hobby; it gives us the opportunity to meet new people along the way. What could be better?

friendshipSo thank you, EVERYONE, for your continued support! I began this journey before I turned the big 50 and now it’s been five years? Sigh…oh well, let the fun continue…


and now please join me in celebrating by singing, dancing,

hot party

 

 

 


 

and toasting to another awesome blogging year!

toasting glasses

 

 

 

 

Sending lots of love, Lauren ♥ ♫ xo

Five Ways Novelists Are Just Like Poets

I’m sharing a wonderful and informative post by my good friend, Louise, from her blog, A.B. Michaels and am honored to have been included in this comparison between novelists and poets.  She is the amazing author of a romantic series, Sinner’s Grove, The Art of Love, and The Lair, which are all available on Amazon. I encourage you to take the time to visit her site, http://abmichaels.com.

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00NE18GYY
http://www.amazon.com/Art-Love-Origins-Sinners-Grove-ebook/dp/B00K5C0JYA/
http://www.amazon.com/Lair-Sinners-Grove-Novel-ebook/dp/B00YYJT2G6/

The Lair by AB Michaels

A very good friend from my years in northern California is the poet Lauren Scott. (lscotthoughts.com). We are both writers, but while she writes pieces with minimal words, I write full-length novels. Not much overlap, right? Wrong. The truth is, long-form writers and poets have quite a bit in common:

We both love words. I mean love them. I know that even though she may write a first draft intuitively, Lauren considers every single word that goes into every single poem she writes. Is it conveying the emotion I want it to? Is it describing the scene I’ve created as well as it could? Does it sound right next to the other words I’ve chosen?
As a novelist, I do the same thing, except that I have a bit more latitude, because my readers are kind enough to give me ample space to set my scene, introduce my characters, tell my story, and so forth. But sometimes, having all that leeway causes “bloviating,” as one television commentator calls it. I simply write too much and have to get rid of the excess. Sometimes that’s painful. Sometimes, for the sake of the story, I have to say goodbye to a bit of writing I love very much. My guess is, sometimes Lauren has to say the same goodbyes. With such a short form within which to share her vision, she can’t afford to have even one word that doesn’t work for her.
BOOK COVER FINAL 1.26.15

Our words must tell a story. Novelists like me have hundreds of pages in which to tell their story; poets like Lauren measure the length of their work in lines, not pages. Yet we must both serve the same master: the story.
I so admire the discipline that Lauren and other poets use to shape their work, that I thought I’d share a writing exercise that fiction writers sometimes use to fine tune their editing chops. The general term for it is “flash fiction” and those of you who like poetry might also follow flash fiction writers.
I subscribe to a writing blog written by Morgen E. Bailey (she’s a writer in the U.K.) https://morgenbailey.wordpress.com/flash-fiction-fridays/ and she regularly publishes examples of very short fiction (less than 500 words) and better yet, six-word stories. That’s right. Six words. Even Lauren’s poetry has more than six words!

The key to this exercise is that your six words must tell a story.

“She had a new blue cell.” Is there a story there? Meh.

“The cell beeped and she screamed.” A story? Possibly. As readers, we wonder, why did she scream? Who was calling her that she should have such an extreme reaction? Is she in danger now? Yeah, but maybe she just wasn’t used to the sound and that’s all it was. Not much of a story after all.

“The cell’s silence lacerated her heart.” Not great, but best of the bunch, I think. We imagine something intense is going on with the woman; she’s experiencing a profound sadness because someone on the other end of that cell isn’t calling. There’s a story there. Both Lauren and I look for the story and try to tell it the best way we can.

We seek an emotional response. Okay, so the beeping cell that caused the woman to scream? Maybe it’s a story, maybe not. Let’s say it is. Are we emotionally invested? We might surmise the woman’s in danger, but do we really care enough about her at this point? I don’t (but maybe I’m cold and heartless!). In example three, however, the reader has a sharper sense of what’s going on. We don’t know the details, but we wonder. And we empathize. In short, we connect. Lauren strives for that response from the reader and so do I.
We strive to capture the imagination through imagery. In long form, this is a matter of style. Some writers take great pride in their descriptive ability; they love to use metaphor and simile to describe character, setting or emotion. Others feel their work is best served by keeping such word play to a minimum. I’m somewhere in the middle. Too much of “The willows undulated like dancers in a riverfront’s far flung chorus line” takes me away from the story; too little leaves me feeling like I’ve just eaten unbuttered toast. I strive to keep the right balance in my writing.
For poets like Lauren, however, capturing the reader’s attention through vivid imagery is their stock in trade. Since they work with so few words, they have to make virtually every word do some heavy lifting. Here’s an example from Lauren’s poem, “Pillow”:

It’s not the best night
for a mutual agreement
instead my stomach
entertains a live
basketball game
where thoughts dribble
and strategy is weak
You ask about the score?
It’s looking like a blowout,
not in my favor

©2015 Lauren Scott

I can perfectly picture what Lauren’s protagonist is going through, thanks to her basketball game metaphor. I too look for ways to bring the idea I want to get across through vivid images.

We want our readers to take something away from the experience. Let’s face it – most writers, even if their main goal is to entertain, consider it a bonus if their readers walk away with something – a thought, a feeling, a new way of looking at some aspect of life, a nugget they might remember and mull over after they’ve read the last line or the last page. Consciously or not, we interject theme into our work, that underlying takeaway. It’s our way of saying, “Hey, this is what I think or feel or wonder about this subject, and I’d like to share it with you.” Poets and writers of any form have this trait in common. It’s what keeps us tapping away.
Are you a poetry lover? Have you ever used that form to express yourself? What other similarities do you see with longer forms of writing? I’d love to hear from you.

P.S. Lauren’s books of poetry are available on Amazon, Barnes and Nobel, and Xlibris (links are below)

http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=Finding+a+Balance+Lauren+Scott
http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/new-day-new-dreams-lauren-scott/1117050670?ean=9781483685687
http://bookstore.xlibris.com/Products/SKU-0140289049/New-Day-New-Dreams.aspx

(ALL proceeds will be donated to The Chris Klug Foundation to help spread the importance of becoming an organ donor; to offer second chances on life.)